Sunday, 8 May 2011

T is for...The Turbulent Term of Tyke Tiler

When I was ten I had a lovely teacher who really encouraged reading and creativity. We had a reading list of books that actually sounded interesting – there was Tyke Tiler, Stig of the Dump, Ghosts in the Attic (The Dollhouse Murders) - many different books to hook our imagination.

The author Gene Kemp uses a first-person narrative so we can see exactly what the protagonist, Tyke, sees. Tyke is a fearless twelve-year old who often gets into trouble, although never means things to turn out quite the way they do. It looks at life and the situations during the final year at Cricklepit Combined School, and is a very humorous, realistic (for the time) slice of life. It was the first book I read that had a swear word in it (git!). I remember dreading my turn to read a chapter aloud to the class (and secretly really wanting to!) in case the chapter picked was the one that had the naughty word.

The best thing about the book is the twist at the end – it is very unexpected, but at the same time, it really shouldn’t be – and the very reason why it is unexpected is worth exploring. Definitely a book to make a class think.

The Turbulent term of Tyke Tiler
Published: 1977
Author: Gene Kemp

Turbulent fact one: Every plane I have been on is turbulent around meal-times.

Turbulent fact two: The quickest way to make me ill is to sit me at the back of the car and drive around roundabouts in heavy traffic on a hot day.

Turbulent fact three: I was such a bad car traveller when I was little that my dad and brother would drive ahead with all the luggage and me and mum would have to get the train.

Turbulent fact four: The worst boat ride I’ve ever been on was a ferry from Guernsey. Everyone suffered!

Turbulent fact five: Not surprisingly - I love trains (especially the vintage steam train from Swanage to Corfe Castle). No turbulence to be found!

13 comments:

catdownunder said...

Yes, a great book!

snafu said...

I have not read that one, it would have been around when my kids were small but they seem to have missed it. They did have Stig of the Dump. Trains are definitely less turbulent than other forms of travel, even when crossing the channel.

The Words Crafter said...

This sounds like a great children's book! Being American, I don't know exactly what 'git' means....

I take Dramamine if I'm traveling anywhere in the back of a car or van. Migraine!

I wish we had trains in the south....

Hope you're having a lovely weekend!

Jayne said...

The Words Crafter - 'git' is like a grittier stronger way to say 'idiot'. It's mild swearing really, but still swearing none-the-less!

Beth said...

What a cute post! I love the sound of that book. And I had carsickness problems when I was young too!

permanent magenta said...

Delightful sounding books, new to me. I got sick in the car a lot as a child but not that much:)

Talli Roland said...

Wow, you must have really hated the car! :)

snafu said...

As far as I am aware, 'git' was used largely around the Liverpool area where they have their own patios known as Scouse and git was made famous by the Beatles who included it in some of their song lyrics. Pretty mild stuff really and there is a red wine you can buy now called Old Git.

Pam Torres said...

Looks like a fun book. I've always been jealous of those who can read in the car. Not me, if I don't look out the window I quickly begin getting green around the gills. Not fair!

Happy Frog and I said...

Another fascinating post. I just loved the turbulent fact that your Mum and you had to travel down separately on the train. Priceless!

Angela Felsted said...

This looks like a really great book!

Bluebell Books said...

I read graphic novels as a kid,

love watching classical movies as well.

lovely you.
keep it up.

check out short story slam and make a submission today.

iloveroutine said...

The Turbulent Term of Tyke Tiler is still one of my favourite books. I was a bit of tea-leaf when I was little, and stole a copy of the book from my school classroom, I loved it that much (still have it 20-odd years later).